Kirkland Kennels

The Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

The Yorkshire Terrier, nicknamed the Yorkie, seems quite full of himself, and why not? With his long silky coat and perky topknot, the Yorkshire Terrier is one of the most glamorous representatives of the dog world, sure to attract attention wherever he goes. Because he's so small he often travels in style — in special dog purses toted around by his adoring owner. The long steel-blue and tan coat may be the Yorkie's crowning glory, but it's his personality that truly endears him to his family. Oblivious to his small size (weighing in at no more than seven pounds), the Yorkshire Terrier is a big dog in a small body, always on the lookout for adventure and maybe even a bit of trouble. Yorkshire Terriers are affectionate towards their people as one would expect from a companion dog, but true to their terrier heritage, they're sometimes suspicious of strangers, and will bark at strange sounds and intruders. In consideration of your neighbors, it's important to tone down their yappiness and teach them when and when not to bark. They also can be aggressive toward strange dogs, and no squirrel is safe from them. Despite their bravado, Yorkshire Terriers have a soft side too. They need lots of attention and time with their family. Long hours of being left alone is not for them. It's not a good idea to over-protect your Yorkie, however; they'll pick up on your feelings very quickly, and if your actions say the world's a dangerous place for them, they can become neurotic. Because of their size, Yorkshire Terriers do better with older children who've been taught to respect them than with toddlers and small children. They can become snappish if they're startled or teased. As long as they get some exercise every day — perhaps a good play session in the living room or a nice walk around the block — Yorkies make fine apartment dogs. No matter what home they live in, they'll get along with other resident dogs and cats — so long as they were raised with them. Yorkies may become possessive of their owners if a new pet is brought into the house. Being terriers, they may want to challenge the "intruder," and if a fight breaks out, the terrier spirit is to fight to the death. Take a lot of care when you're introducing a Yorkie to a new animal. A glamorous coat, small size, spunky personality, and undying loyalty to his people. Is it any wonder that Yorkshire Terriers are the second most popular dog breed in the U.S. today?